null

Sudamericana La Comida en la Historia Argentina by Daniel Balmaceda

(No reviews yet) Write a Review
UPC:
9789500756419
Weight:
0.38 KGS
Gift wrapping:
Options available
US $32.47 & eligible for FREE Shipping

Currently in stock.

Choose now FedEx Economy Saver at checkout for FREE shipping on orders over US $50. Arrives in 3 to 5 business days (US/Canada & more). This item ships to other international locations, please see below.

You can confirm shipping methods and prices to your address on the shopping cart page or at checkout before placing an order.

US & Canada: flat-rate US $7.99 shipping, or free on orders over US $50. Arrives in 3 to 5 business days.

Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru & more in Americas: flat-rate US $9.99 shipping, or free on orders over US $50. Arrives in 3 to 5 business days.

UK, France, Germany, Italy & more in Europe: flat-rate US $9.99 shipping, or free on orders over US $65. Arrives in 4 to 6 business days.

Australia: free on orders over US $75. Find calculated rates at checkout. Arrives in 5 to 7 business days.

Asia: flat-rate US $14.99 shipping, or free on orders over US $100. Arrives in business 5 to 7 days.

Middle East & Africa: free on orders over US $59-100 depending on location. Find calculated rates at checkout. Arrives in 7 to 9 business days.

Rest of the World: find calculated rates at checkout.

FedEx Priority also available at checkout in eligible regions.

Lifetime Satisfaction Guarantee If you are not completely satisfied with your purchase, please contact us for a replacement or refund.

Secure Payments Pay with all debit and credit cards processed by PayPal using secure 256-bit encrypted SSL. No PayPal account or login is required, no payment information is stored.

Frequently bought together:

Description

Food in Argentine history reviews myths and legends about the origin of a wide variety of foods, from empanadas and hamburgers to chivito and locro, through all kinds of desserts, cakes and other sweet delicacies. Rescue the stories of some emblematic restaurants and pioneers such as Noel, Magnasco, Saint or Fort, with juicy anecdotes that link personalities from our history with food. And, moreover, he proposes "historical" recipes in almost every chapter.
At the end of the XIX century, bar owners sent their employees to gather hail to refresh drinks. When Sarmiento tried to incorporate vegetables into the daily diet, they mocked him and called him "eat grass". Borges' favorite dessert was cheese and sweet. It is not true that the edecán de Julio Roca created the famous scrambled Gramajo: Félix Luna imagined history at the service of fiction. The birthplace of dulce de leche could have been Asia, instead of Argentina. At the beginning of the twentieth century, construction workers had a potty lunch in the middle of the construction site. In her first presentation, Petrona C. de Gandulfo had her mayonnaise cut five times. The choripán as we know it today was born in Córdoba. The pancho arrived in Argentina from France, not from the United States. And the desserts? Did San Martín have ice cream?

View AllClose